Becoming: worlds in flux 10 July–24 August 2012

Becoming: worlds in flux
Press Release

Becoming: worlds in flux
7.10.12-8.24.12

In an endless act of imagination the world is reinvented every day. Mindful that each of us improvises our self in this concert of infinite complexity and possibility the artists featured in Becoming: worlds in flux each create delicate, intimate and exhilarating realms within this ever shifting fabric.

This exhibition draws together a diverse selection of five artists from Germany, Japan, the Netherlands and Australia. Benjamin Armstrong transports the viewer into a grotesque and yet beautiful territory that confounds familiar categories. This otherworld of strange entities and interiorities, disquieting geographies and morphologies, triggers disorienting, compulsive responses in the viewer. Motoko Dobashi creates fantastical, labyrinthine architectural wall drawings, and works on paper that fuse once distinct traditions, mythologies and genres suggesting unforeseeable futures fecund with possibility. Takahiro Iwasaki builds exquisite, intricate, almost impossibly tiny structures, associated with industrial society and faith traditions on micro landscapes (of towels and other domestic fabrics) that seem one breath away from destruction. An air of longing pervades Jennifer Tee's performative installations and collages. Her complex multilayered pieces poetically blur the categories of fact and fiction, past and present and evoke the dislocating sense of in-betweeness that shapes contemporary experience. Using neon Brendan Van Hek produces gently glowing fields and geometries of light and energy that resonate with multiple histories, radiate luminous beauty and are imbued with a quiet spirituality.

Becoming is a precarious state. Always in the making and being unmade – each and every day – the world we inhabit relentlessly shifts, morphs and is transformed.

Curated by Melissa Keys.

The artists and curator of Becoming: worlds in flux are all 2012 residents at the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP), Brooklyn.

PDF 469k