ARTFORUM reviews Tommy Hartung in September 2018 issue

Tommy Hartung

C24 Gallery

By Ania Szremski

Science fiction flourishes in the “great whirlpool periods of history,” according to Darko Suvin, a pioneering theorist of that critically disdained genre. The Czech intellectual Karel Čapek wrote during one of those traumatic times—just after the unspeakable devastation of World War I, just before the ascension of the Third Reich, and during the rise of communism (a philosophy he virulently opposed). Čapek’s 1920 play R.U.R.: Rossum’s Universal Robotsis a drama about a cheap workforce of manufactured humanoids who murder their human creators. It’s now best remembered for introducing the word robot, derived from the pan-Slavic word for “labor.”

Tommy Hartung is also working during a great whirlpool period of history, so it makes sense that he would turn to this early sci-fi classic as the loose inspiration for his exhibition at C24 Gallery, eponymously titled “R.U.R.” Almost a century after it was written, Čapek’s piece eerily reflects our tortured present through the anxieties that inform it: the fear of automation, the soul-crushing domination of work over life, technological progress run amok. While these concerns were also undercurrents in Hartung’s three-part, mixed-reality installation (comprising elements that slide between the virtual and the physical), he primarily, and weirdly, focuses on the least remarkable aspect of the play: its sexist depiction of women, as represented by a ditzy robot and an Eve-like character, the latter of whom accidently ensures the destruction of the human race.

Hartung rolls Čapek’s cruel treatment of women into a condemnation of the abuses that gave rise to the #MeToo movement. The exhibition began with R.U.R. Act One: The Viewer, 2017, an eight-minute animation that features, in a voice-over, Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman reading a statement denouncing her abuser, Dr. Larry Nassar. Two handmade doll heads were mounted on poles in front of the screen. Cameras installed in their hollowed eye sockets captured the viewer, incorporating that person into the animation—an obvious comment on the complicity of the passive spectator. The focal point of the show, R.U.R. Act Three: Silent Siege, 2018, also surveilled. A dummy partially shielded by branches stands in front of a collage-like projection, its creepily emptied eyes also fitted with cameras, absorbing and projecting the viewer’s image into the video (which the artist can manipulate remotely). The piece continues the Nassar storyline, which unfolds with an actual recording of an angry phone call from an unidentified woman accusing Nassar’s wife of knowing about the abuse. The artist then placed it alongside images and texts pertaining to real-life pedophiles and assailants with whom he’d had direct unwanted contact. These were mixed in with textual allusions to Čapek’s play.

There was nothing particularly transformative about this on-the-nose performance of “the male ally.” I would probably dismiss the project altogether if it were by the hand of a less dexterous artist. Yet, despite Hartung’s intentions, there were certain formal elements that cast an undeniable spell: disturbing little handmade puppets and their jerky movements; rhythmic patterns of hallucinatory color; sudden peaceful footage of sky and ocean; humorous, robot-like GIFs frenetically layered on top of jittering, discordant images. A quietly entrancing moment happened in the show’s second act, made up of three touch-screen monitors that the viewer could manipulate. Each displays a 360-degree video collage, partially shot in the garden of the artist’s former Connecticut home. In the first (They’re Less Than Grass, 2018), a hawk stares cautiously, curiously, into the camera, then emits a plaintive screech. The other two (Humans are too expensive but their behavior is priceless and Imitating Nature Without Pity, both 2018) are layered with animations of snails, ants, and hatching butterflies. As you swirled the images around, they split and fractured into whorling abstractions.

These shifting perspectives were the keenest part of the exhibition. The artworks watch the viewer watching them; they resist being completely seen; they come apart at the seams. This is another connection between Hartung and Čapek—two artists working in harrowing times, witnessing things falling apart, holding the broken pieces up to see.

...

Read in full here or in the September 2018 issue of ARTFORUM. 

Source: https://www.artforum.com/print/reviews/201...

"From the Cradle to the Boat" on ARTNEWS

‘From the Cradle to the Boat’ at C24 Gallery, New York

BY The Editors of ARTnews

Pictures at an Exhibition presents images of one notable show every weekday.

Today’s show: “From the Cradle to the Boat” is on view at C24 Gallery in New York through Friday, August 24. The group exhibition, curated by Tommy Hartung, includes work by Tamy Ben-Tor, Miki Carmi, Justin Cloud, Clark Filo, Michael Guardiola, O.K. Fox, Reagan Holiday, Monilola Ilupeju, Bahareh Khoshooee, Jeremy Olson, Lynsey Peisinger, and Tommy White. The show also hosts performances by Linda Fletcher, Lynsey Peisinger, Reagan Holiday, and Tamy Ben-Tor.

View the full article here

Tommy Hartung's "Lesser Key of Solomon" featured in series screening "cutting edge short films"

By Julia Morgenstern

The Peekskill Film Festival and the Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art (HVCCA) are teaming up to present BLACKOUT a screening of cutting edge short films, on July 26 from 7 to 9 p.m. This work blurring the distinction between art, film, and theatre questions the conventions of film screenings in art galleries. While film is prevalent in the art world, this event takes a new spin on that connection. BLACKOUT will take place on the big screen in a dark theater, instead of in a traditional white box gallery space on smaller screens shared with other art. This exciting twist should shake up the way audiences take in the series of short films, which seems to fit with the goal of this screening.


“These videos were made for both the small personal screen and the large cinematic screen,” says Sarada Rauch, artist behind the “short” music video Topple, which plays with ideas of scale. “There are three main points of interest to me when seeing my music videos on a large screen with seated viewers: perspective, object and narrative.…The screen itself can be considered an object that has the ability to shift perspective."

 The title of the series, BLACKOUT, comes from the theatrical convention of turning off all of the lights between scenes to allow for a transition. “In this moment of media blackouts, political corruption, and widespread violation of human rights; revealing hidden narratives through the arts continues to be of the utmost importance,” says Michael Barraco, curator of BLACKOUT and Director of Education for the HVCCA.

Read full article here.

Exhibition Review of Tommy Hartung's R.U.R. on Eazel

Tommy Hartung and R.U.R.

By Patrick Rolandelli  

July 9, 2018

Last June Eazel attended the private closing reception for R.U.R., Tommy Hartung’s inaugural exhibition at C24 Gallery in Chelsea. Several times that month we had passed by the ominous display in the gallery’s window featuring colorful masks reminiscent of the 1980s horror movie genre. The display had piqued our curiosity and we were surprised when we learned the exhibition was addressing power relations in society and related issues of male dominance.

Upon stepping into the gallery we turned to look closer at the vinyl masks, set at eye-level atop two black tripods—one painted bright yellow with dayglo orange hair, the other with pastel purple skin and blueberry hair—they stood before a screen showing a series of new media figurations amid the likeness of our faces as captured by cameras inconspicuously observing us through the eyelets of the masks. In the background we could hear Olympic Gold medalist Aly Raisman reading her court statement to recently convicted former USA Gymnastics National Team doctor, Larry Nassar—the pitch of her voice downshifted slightly. The experience had this DIY surrealist aesthetic to it—to borrow language from the exhibition’s press release.

After checking in with the front desk we wandered around the gallery taking in the broad range of the exhibition’s featured artworks—from traditional sculptures, to painted theatrical props, to interactive digital screen art featured on a row of monitors down the center of the gallery.

As Hartung would later explain, the themes of Karel Čapek’s 1921 play, R.U.R., served both as the inspiration, as well as the conceptual basis for his exhibition in three acts—The ViewerTouch, and Silent Siege—with the front, center, and back sections of the gallery dedicated to exploring these themes, respectively.

We were in the back of the gallery where Silent Siege consisted of video feeds embedded around a large viewing area as part of a performative work about data collection and the nature of consent when we noticed one of the gallery assistants beginning to gather the group and direct us toward Hartung near the entrance of the gallery where he was to begin his talk.

During his presentation we learned the imagery of the exhibition was meant to counter the modern era’s romanticized concept of technology—that it was alluding to a dystopian future disillusioned with modernism. And true to Čapek’s play, Hartung unpacked how through his use of multiple mediums—from stop-motion animation, to digital photography, to traditional sculptures—he was seeking to question the degree to which the spirit of modernism has truly served the greater good.

There wasn’t enough time to sit down with Hartung after his talk, so we arranged for a follow-up conversation with the gallery director and catch up with him a week later.

Read the full article here.

Tommy Hartung and Amanda Long's collaborative community piece "Rainbow Mural" featured in Times Ledger

Art in the Parks program kicks off throughout the borough

By Julia Moro

With warm weather approaching, it is the perfect time to visit local parks. Further adding to the fun is the city Parks Department’s public art program, Art in the Parks, which announced new outdoor exhibitions at Forest Park, Lewis H. Latimer House and MacDonald Park. 

Amanda Long and Tommy Hartung’s work, “Rainbow Mural,” is on display at the Greenhouse Playground off the Woodhaven Boulevard entrance to Forest Park. This piece runs along about 800 feet of retaining wall located across the playground and skate park near the historic carousel.

“The public interacting with my work has always been a central focus. Often the work is less about my intent and more about the public feeling,” Long said.

It was important to the two artists to make a collaborative piece with the community to show that art can be a social gathering. The making of this mural was, in part, the artists’ work; but it was also painted by local volunteers and children who enjoy the park.

The work the two artists and the community have done shows a painted, pixelated rainbow pattern. A portion of the mural is in colorful chalkboard paint so children in the park can continue to add to it.

Read the entire article here.

Tommy Hartung and Amanda Long's "Rainbow Mural" transforms Forest Park in Queens

Art in The Parks Program to Install Works in Forest and MacDonald Parks

By Tara Law

Colorful contemporary works of art are transforming Queens Parks into open air galleries for a limited time.

NYC Parks is currently in the process of installing three pieces of art in Queens Parks. Two works of art have already been put in place at Lewis H. Latimer House and in Forest Park, and a third will be put in place in MacDonald Park this month.

The installations are being made through the Art in the Parks initiative, a 50-year-old contemporary art program. NYC Parks has collaborated with 1,300 artists to install more than 2,000 works of art in public spaces.

Artists Amanda Long and Tommy Hartung’s work “Rainbow Mural” is on display at Greenhouse Playground in Forest Park until May 20, 2019.

The mural, which Parks calls a “pixelated rainbow pattern,” is painted onto 800 feet of retaining wall by the playground and skate park on Woodhaven Boulevard by the carousel. Part of the mural was made with chalkboard paint, where children can doodle with chalk.

The artwork is located off the Woodhaven Boulevard entrance to Forest Park.

Read the full article here.

 

Tommy Hartung in Conversation

Tommy Hartung in Conversation

May 31st, 6:30 - 8pm

560 West 24th Street, NYC 10011

Join artist Tommy Hartung in conversation with curator Tim Goossens, for an intimate talk in conjunction with R.U.R., a solo exhibition of new work by Tommy Hartung on view now at C24 Gallery.

R.U.R. is a reinterpretation of Karel Čapek’s 1921 science fiction play of the same name (most notably remembered as the first text to use the term “robot”), re-written through Hartung’s surrealist DIY aesthetic and stream of consciousness storytelling. Presented in three acts, the exhibition features photographs, sculptures, and interactive videos that investigate the rapid progression of technology, and the systems of power that both result from and are fueled by the uncertainties that come along with the dehumanization of everyday life, work, and activities as human interactions become more and more steeped in technology, or “robotized”.  Dealing with themes of power constructs, manipulation, and male dominance, the exhibition is particularly timely given the recent sentencing of Larry Nassar - a key subject of Hartung’s work depicted throughout R.U.R.

Tim Goossens serves as faculty member MA at Sotheby’s Institute of Art and as one of the youngest senior faculty members at The School of the New York Times. Congruently and for over a decade, he has continued to expand his curatorial practice and social activism with a variety of public art festivals, triennials, art commissions and numerous independent projects worldwide, all of which inspires his research as a contributing editor for Oxford University Press.  He began his career at MoMA shortly after double graduate school and moved as assistant-curator to MoMA PS1, where he worked closely with the founding director, renowned artists and emerging talent alike. At these institutions and beyond, he has worked with artists such as Kenneth Anger, Bjork, Joan Jonas, Sam Moyer, Stephen Posen, Yoko Ono, Patti Smith, and the estate of David Wojnarowicz. He has curated numerous international projects including Listen Up!, India’s first public sound art exhibition, Till I Get It Right (Labor, Mexico City, 2015), Dark Paradise (Clocktower, NYC and Nara Roesler, Brazil, 2013) and Larger than Love (as part of Berlin Biennial, 2012). In recent years he was one of the curators for Aurora, the large-scale public art festival in Dallas, Texas, and for This is the sound of ™, at the Triennial in Belgium.

The free talk takes place May 31 from 6:30 - 8pm at C24 Gallery.

Please RSVP by sending an email to info@c24gallery.com

The Gaurdian highlights Tommy Hartung

Frieze New York: how this year's art fair got political

The annual New York City-based incarnation of the much-anticipated art fair is heading to the streets with a powerful set of protest-themed pieces

By Nadja Sayej

Wedged between South Bronx and Harlem, Randall’s Island in New York City has an unlikely past – part of it was previously called “Negro Point”.

It first got its name, officially, in 1984 after being referred to as such since the late 1800s and was renamed in 2001 when it was brought to the attention of the city’s parks commissioner, Henry J Stern.

Thanks to Stern, it is now called Scylla Point, in reference to the mythological sea monsters Scylla and Charybdis (nearby is Charybdis Playground in Astoria Park).

But that’s not enough, which is why the annual Frieze art fair – which opens today on Randall’s Island – invited New York artist Adam Pendleton to hang a flag at Scylla Point that reads “Black Lives Matter”.

“I called up Adam and said, ‘I can’t be who I am and not acknowledge this history,’” said Adrienne Edwards, a curator at this year’s fair. “I asked him to consider placing the flag at ‘Negro Point’ as a gesture to see how the flag holds that space.”

It’s an attempt to bring politically charged projects to the same old booth-and-blue-chip annual event, as Edwards is curating Frieze New York’s first annual Live section, which is devoted to the poetics of protest.

Edwards, who works as the performance curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, included Pendelton’s project and others for a project she has titled Assembly.

“I believe art is not made in the world but of the world,” said Edwards.

It’s an antidote to the usual booth-driven, fluorescent-lit art fair, where roughly 195 galleries from 30 countries are inside five white tents.

“There’s a rich history here of artists speaking to the social and political issues of their time,” she said. “In my lifetime, I have never seen anything like what’s happening right now politically; the broader world has changed and the consciousness has been raised.”

Also on view are large-scale American flags by New York artist Hank Willis Thomas, who has hand-embroidered over 15,000 stars, representing the number of people who lost their lives to gun violence in the country from 2016 to 2017.

“Since February, 2,000 people have been shot and killed in America,” said Thomas. “Often, we have memorials and monuments to people who are fallen heroes, but we don’t know who the victims of gun violence were.”

He cites the wars both outside and inside the country. “The fact we had more people killed last year than American soldiers in both wars in Iraq and Afghanistan – which are wars that have been going on for 20 years – is pretty astounding,” he said. “The country will memorialize fallen soldiers, but what about all these other people who died at home for unexplained reasons? This piece is a memorial for fallen stars.”

Also on view is Los Angeles artist Lara Schnitger’s piece Suffragette City, which has the same title as the David Bowie song. This performance art protest for women’s rights will have the artist leading a march with makeshift placards. Rather than words scrawled over the placards, they’re emblazoned with images of women and there will even be a cameo of a handcrafted “goddess” posted up on a wooden plank.

This year, the winner of the annual Frieze artist award went to Canadian artist Kapwani Kiwanga, who has created a public artwork called Shady, a wall-like sculpture made from farmer’s fabric to protect crops, though it looks like a Mexican border wall prototype.

“This particular shade cloth at once evokes this idea of a barrier, as well as a porosity that invites people to think about possible transgression,” Kiwanga told the Art Newspaper.

Together, the political projects raise the importance of bringing the rather insular world of the art fair on to the streets. Which also raises the question of does the art world need to start thinking of art fairs beyond the booth? Perhaps.

As New York magazine art critic Jerry Saltz pointed out, art galleries pay between $15,000 to $125,000 for a booth at Frieze art fair – just for the weekend. But in a time when protest art and public projects garner more intrigue, are art fairs even necessary any more?

Starting at the same time, yet separate to the art fair is a set of virtual reality and video works by New York artist Tommy Hartung, whose RUR project, inspired by the science fiction play by Czech writer Karel Čapek, also look at Facebook’s forthcoming dating service through a creepy lens.

 

 

 

“Facebook began as a misogynist ranking system for frat boys on campus to sexually harass and stalk woman online,” said Hartung. “The internet, in general, has enabled male predators on an unprecedented scale, creating a virtual locker room and normalizing stalker behavior.”

Questions around global warming and nuclear disaster are also abound, like in a flower installation by Japanese artist Atsunobu Katagiri that looks at an endangered flower called the Monochoria korsakowii, which returned after Fukushima stirred up the soil during the tsunami.

Over at the Anat Ebgi gallery booth from Los Angeles, the Arab-American artist Jordan Nassar shows a series of embroidered works honoring the strength of Palestinian women – who the artist met in Israel – while carrying on the details of their handcraft tradition with a sympathetic touch to understand his family’s own past.

New York artist Matthew Brannon also looks back to the past – specifically, the Vietnam war to help understand the present. For his Concerning Vietnamproject at the Casey Kaplan Gallery booth, the artist interviewed war veterans, visited midwestern artillery museums and sifted through piles of declassified documents to better understand the subject, which is a seemingly endless labyrinth captured in a series of graphic, vintage-hued wall works.

While Edwards only curated the Live section and the Frieze Artist Award, her vision seems to cast a timely resonance over the entire show, in general.

“I hope that together, these projects will serve as a platform to help us imagine what is possible today through the poetics of protest,” said Edwardsof the Liveprogram.

“By breaking down boundaries between galleries and the street, the artist and their audience and making new propositions that open up conversations about the role of art in today’s society.”

Read the full article here

    Tommy Hartung: "R.U.R." featured as Must See Exhibition in artnet

    Shows! Shows! Shows! 34 New York Must-See Gallery Exhibitions to See This May                                                                                        Anchored by Frieze Week, May is one of the busiest months for gallery shows in New York.

    By Sarah Cascone & Caroline Goldstein

     “Tommy Hartung: R.U.R.” at C24 Gallery

    If you missed Tommy Hartung’s debut at C24’s Volta booth, here is a second chance to catch his sinister, pixelated interpretation of the classic 1921 play by Karel Čapek, based on a world overrun by robots who have usurped power from their creators. Using interactive videos, photographs, and sculptures, Hartung brings the text to life for a contemporary audience who will undoubtedly draw parallels to everything from Westworld to the recent data-collection hearings around Facebook and Cambridge Analytica.

    Read the Full Article Here

    Tommy Hartung featured in Zealnyc

    Art Break: Galleries Featuring Painting and Sculpture, With Photos By Stanley Kubrick at the Museum of the City of NY

    By A. E. Colas, Contributing Writer

    This week, Art Break’s choices cover a variety of interests. Want to know more about painting? Visit Almine Rech Gallery for a show on late 20th century painting and its relevance. Maybe you prefer photography – in which case, you’ll be checking out Danziger Gallery’s display of Paul Fusco’s pictures. There’s also a great exhibit of Stanley Kubrick’s early work in still photography at The Museum of the City of New York. If you like craft and design, Friedman Benda presents the collective GT2P as well as the artist Erez Nevi Pana. Both are known for their work using natural materials in making sculptures and decorative objects.

    In addition, Galerie Lelong & Co. has Ursula von Rydingsvard, the well-known sculptor whose works use materials ranging from paper to metal. Those among us who admire great draftsmanship will be heading over to Galerie Buchholz to see Paul Bonet’s drawings for the book bindings that gained him international fame among collectors and book lovers everywhere. And if you just like technology, stop in at C24 Gallery and look at Tommy Hartung’s latest show about humans and their fascination with robots. So hop on the train and go see some art!

    At C24 Gallery, Tommy Hartung: R.U.R. (May 4 – June 23, 2018) uses costume, photographs, and interactive video to examine why we are so fascinated by the idea and reality of robots, regardless of the cost to our humanity. You’ll rethink your relationship to technology and its place in your life.

    Read the full article here

    Tommy Hartung at VOLTA NY featured on artnet

    Among art fairs, VOLTA‘s format remains unique, in that all its participating galleries are asked to present a solo booth. It’s a simple conceit, but one that allows for a sense of depth and context, and a level of visual focus that cuts against the visual overload that can make the fairs so fatiguing.

    “Much thought goes into placing the galleries in such a way that meaningful dialogues between different artists, especially in this solo context, create an even deeper understanding and appreciation of the variety of artistic positions presented,” said Amanda Coulson, artistic director of the fair.

    This year marks VOLTA’s eleventh in New York City and its fourth at Pier 90, where the proximity to Armory has boosted attendance considerably. (For the curious, the fair’s name comes from the fact that it got its start as a satellite fair in Basel, Switzerland, where it was housed in a former electric plant there.)

    There’s plenty to see. Don’t miss, for instance, the latest curated group show at the center of the fair. This year’s edition was organized by Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont, titled “The Aesthetics of Matter.” It focuses on collage by several rising stars.

    Below, we break out a few of the standout solo projects of VOLTA New York 2018.

    Alan Fontes at Galeria Emma Thomas, São Paulo, Brazil:

    Houses, or the remnants of their structures in the wake of disaster, are a recurring motif in Brazilian artist Alan Fontes‘s work. The interior of his solo installation booth at Galeria Emma Thomas for VOLTA, titled “The House” is centered on the idea of a three-dimensional painting, says director Camila Neubarth. It conjures up associations of an owner or occupant wandering through their home in the dazed aftermath of catastrophe.

    Visitors navigate detritus including scattered floor tiles, picture frames, suitcases, and bottles, along with destroyed furniture and even a piano, all cast in a dull shade of volcanic ash-gray. The paintings that hang on the walls of the space depict eerie small-scale houses, islands in a sea of black paint as well as larger depictions of houses sliced in half or with entire sections missing, with piles of personal belongings still visible inside, evoking post-disaster news imagery.

    Tommy Hartung at C24, New York:

    Tommy Hartung’s installation at C24 Gallery, titled R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots), is based on Karel Čapek’s 1920 science fiction play where the term “robot” was first used. The play explores the uncertainties raised by the speed of technological progress and the dehumanization that occurs with the robotization of human interactions. In Hartung’s adaptation, the original work is re-written through photographs, costumes, and videos, posing the question of why people want robots to look human.

    Hartung’s photographs consist of character studies and pictures inspired by the constructivist art originally designed for the original play’s playbills. The video installation (above) is flanked by two creepy mannequin heads contain cameras, briefly incorporate the viewer into the video loop.

    William Buchina at Slag Gallery, Brooklyn, New York:

    William Buchina‘s “rephrasing” and reutilization of primary source material are what Slag Gallery gallery director Irina Protopopescu describe as part of “a crusade unpack his own creative process.” The result is an intriguing series of paintings that invite careful study, albeit without delivering a clear or linear narrative. But that’s part of the fun. The process of making the works is central to the story-line, says Protopopescu. “In making them I imagine a lost ritual… random and unrelated elements take over,” Buchina said in a statement.

    Read the full article here.

    Artnet News spotlights Tommy Hartung R.U.R Installation at VOLTA

    From a Ravaged Home to Creepy Mannequin Heads, Here’s What Caught Our Eye at Volta

    The solo-booth format puts the spotlight on some interesting works.

    By Eileen Kinsella

    March 9, 2018

    Among art fairs, VOLTA‘s format remains unique, in that all its participating galleries are asked to present a solo booth. It’s a simple conceit, but one that allows for a sense of depth and context, and a level of visual focus that cuts against the visual overload that can make the fairs so fatiguing.

    “Much thought goes into placing the galleries in such a way that meaningful dialogues between different artists, especially in this solo context, create an even deeper understanding and appreciation of the variety of artistic positions presented,” said Amanda Coulson, artistic director of the fair.

    This year marks VOLTA’s eleventh in New York City and its fourth at Pier 90, where the proximity to Armory has boosted attendance considerably. (For the curious, the fair’s name comes from the fact that it got its start as a satellite fair in Basel, Switzerland, where it was housed in a former electric plant there.)

    There’s plenty to see. Don’t miss, for instance, the latest curated group show at the center of the fair. This year’s edition was organized by Mickalene Thomas and Racquel Chevremont, titled “The Aesthetics of Matter.” It focuses on collage by several rising stars.

    Below, we break out a few of the standout solo projects of VOLTA New York 2018.

    ...

    Tommy Hartung’s installation at C24 Gallery, titled R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots), is based on Karel Čapek’s 1920 science fiction play where the term “robot” was first used. The play explores the uncertainties raised by the speed of technological progress and the dehumanization that occurs with the robotization of human interactions. In Hartung’s adaptation, the original work is re-written through photographs, costumes, and videos, posing the question of why people want robots to look human.

    Read the full article here.

     

    C24 Gallery mentioned in Galerie

    By Paul Laster

    With the influx of art fairs landing in New York this week, advance planning is key. Here, we have sifted through the lists of exhibitors at the top four fairs—the Armory Show, Volta NY, Independent and NADA—to highlight the art and artists that we believe merit the most attention.

    VOLTA NY

    Nearby at Pier 90, the 11th edition of the Armory Show’s sister fair, Volta NY, offers 85 galleries from 48 cities presenting a global vision of contemporary art.

    Collage is at the core of much of the art on view at the fair, ranging from the gallery booths to the curated group exhibition. Colombian artist Harold Ortiz, for example, manipulates illegally downloaded image bank pictures in his photographs at Medellin’s Timebag; Damien Hoar de Galvan assembles cut pieces of painted wood to construct organic and geometric forms on simple bases at Seattle’s Studio E; Tommy Hartung juxtaposes his own creations with found materials and footage to create fragmented cultural narratives in video, photography and sculpture at New York’s C24 Gallery; and Jean-Sébastien Denislayers a variety of painterly marks on Mylar to construct colorful abstract paintings at Montreal’s Galerie Simon Blais.

    New York–based artist Mickalene Thomas and independent curator Racquel Chevremont joined forces to organize “The Aesthetics of Matter” in the Curated Section of the fair. Taking collage as the point of departure, the eight-artist exhibition explores the medium through cultural, personal, and material concepts. Standout artists in the show include Tomashi Jackson, who uses Josef Albers’s 1963 text Interaction of Color to explore the history of racial segregation in her painterly assemblages; David Shrobe, who creates surreal portraits by combining his figurative paintings and drawings with found materials; and Kennedy Yanko, who makes abstract sculptures by blending rubbery skins of poured paint and crumpled paper with bits of marble and scrap metal. Pier 90, New York City

    Read the full article here